Lesson of Life – Relativity Law

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Take A Good Care of Your Life!

Some interesting pictures were sent by friend months ago. These pictures remind me of one law that supports Law of Attraction

I call it  Relativity  Law, means :

Nothing is bad or good, big or small, near or far, cheap or expensive, and so on… until we COMPARE it with others

For example :

1. We feel fail because can’t accomplish works we are asked to do. But compare it with others who are unemployment. We are still better than them.

2. We still stay in a rent house (can’t buy a house). It’s still better than them who stay ‘underneath stars’.

3. Remember, we still have family that we care and love. Sometimes they do annoy us. Yet it’s still better than them who don’t know their family (father, mother, brother, sister, etc)

Means we need to exercise our situation with something less and we will always feel better. On the other hand, we have to compare with something better only to light our spirit : s/he can do it, I can do it too.

The pictures tell us about a young girl feels desperate of her life and she decides to jump off from top of the building. During her way to the ground, she is seeing her neighbors at every floor. Each of them has their own problem : couples fight, a widow left-died by husband, a lonely old man expecting visits from family, a stressful lady, a jobless man, and so on. Until she realises that her problem is not that bad as others face. But it’s too late as she hits the ground.

So be careful with your life!

I’ll recommend the 7 Ups for you to exercise in your life :

1. Wake Up – Decide to have a good day!

2. Dress Up – The best way to dress up is to put on a smile. A smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

3. Shut Up – Say nice things and learn to listen. With two ears and one mouth, it’s meant for us to do twice as much listening as talking.

4. Stand Up – . . . for what you believe in. Stand for something or you will fall for anything. “Let us not be weary in doing good; for at the proper time, we will reap a harvest if we do not give up. Therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good…”

5. Look Up – . . . Keep yourself centered. Remember, you are important.

6. Reach Up – . . . for something higher. Trust with all your heart, and lean not unto your own understanding.

7. Lift Up – . .. . your Prayers. “Do not worry about anything; instead PRAY ABOUT EVERYTHING.”

Those 7 Ups above are what I practice everyday. The important thing here is to take an action. It’s useless even we have all the knowledge from books, articles, seminars, other people experience but we never apply it to our live.

I really emphasize this to you : learn from the best, get the knowledge and skills, and apply it, and keep praying for the best.

Happy reading and best of lucks to you…

P.S. The pictures can be seen in my Flickr Photo Sharing

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How to Catch Caterpie in the Wild

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Here’s tips on how to catch a wild Caterpie in the wild.

1. Caterpie’s capabilities.

Caterpie is a fairly easy Pokemon to capture in the games. Bring along flying types and fire types to cover yourself against it and always try to make sure to have False swipe to help bring their HP, hit points to one very easily.

2. Use Status effects like Sleep Powder and so on.

One of the best ways to capture Pokemon is by using status effect moves on them. Capture a Pokemon like Butterfree or Venasaur and use moves like Sleep Powder on them to be able to easily put them to sleep. You can also use other Pokemon to help put them to sleep as such as well. Things like Hypnosis can be used by Pokemon named Gastly, Hypno, Gengar, and so on as well. Stun Spore is also an excellent move to use and utilize on a Pokemon to help capture it easier in the wild while playing Pokemon. A better move that has the same effect as Stun Spore which causes paralysis is a move named Thunder Wave. Lot’s of Pokemon can learn this move like Alakazam, Ampharos, Pikachu, Jolteon, and so on. If you are able to stun and paralyze your opponent then the act of capturing them becomes child’s play in that moment. The chances for catch rate and capturing the Pokemon increase significantly. The last possible decent methods for capture is possibly poison and maybe frozen here and there. Poison is generally not always recommended since this heightens the chance of the Pokemon being able to lose and faint before you can even capture it. The frozen status condition is very rare and difficult/hard to pull off so I would not rely on this condition to inflict a good and useful status condition on the Pokemon you wish to capture.

Bring lots of Pokeballs unique and quantity wise.

Be sure to always buy lots of Pokeballs to further progress capturing the Pokemon you wish to catch. Quick balls are always useful to throw on the first turn of a battle since that’s the higher success rate of usage for them. Next you can always spam Pokeballs for cheap to test the waters and see how hard it is to catch this particular Pokemon. Ultra balls and Great balls are always the best option for high success rate of any Pokemon in any general area. If at nighttime or in a cave Dusk balls are the way to go. And other good options are such like Net balls for Water and bug types and Heavy balls for heavy weighted Pokemon as well too.

Those are the best tips to capture Caterpie and other general Pokemon. Feel free to manage and capture Pokemon the best you can and always have fun with Nintendo and playing Pokemon no matter what.

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The History of Francis S Gabreski Airport

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Located on 1,451 acres three miles north of West Hampton Beach in the Town of Southampton in Suffolk County, Long Island, county-owned Francis S. Gabreski Airport is both a civil and military facility and serves as the gateway to Long Island’s famed Hamptons. It has a rich history.

Constructed in 1943 as a World War II United States Army Air Force sub-base of Mitchel Field, it was later assigned to the First Air Force, whose 437th Army Air Force Base flew anti-submarine patrols. After the war, it was designated a civilian field.

Once again reverting to military application in 1951 because of the Korean War National Emergency, it was renamed Suffolk County Air Force Base. The Air National Guard’s 103rd Fighter-Interceptor Wing, along with the 118th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron and its fleet of Republic P-47N Thunderbolts, was federalized that year and relocated from Brainerd Field in Connecticut to the air base on June 1.

The 103rd Fighter-Interceptor Wing was replaced by the 45th and 75th Fighter-Interceptor Squadrons in November of 1952, which operated North American F-86 Sabre Jets as part of the 23rd Fighter-Interceptor Group.

After three years, the group itself was reassigned to Presque Isle Air Force Base in Maine and replaced by the newly activated 52nd Fighter-Interceptor Wing.

Because of the Vietnam War-caused financial constraints, the Suffolk County Air Force Base was deactivated in 1969 and was once again transferred to Suffolk County for civilian operations for the purpose of “the development, improvement, and operation and maintenance of the airport” under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration.

Yet military operations were reintroduced in June of 1970 when the 102nd Air Refueling Squadron of the New York Air National Guard was transferred there from the now-closed Floyd Bennett Field Naval Air Station, basing its Boeing KC-97 Strato-freighters there.

Redesignated Francis S. Gabreski Airport in 1991 after America’s greatest living ace, today it serves as a private, corporate, and air taxi facility and is also home to the 106th Rescue Wing of the Air National Guard, which operates Lockheed HC-130P Hercules and HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, the only fleet of rescue aircraft based in the northeastern part of the country.

With three runways–5,000-foot 01/19, 9,000-foot 06/24, and 5,000-foot 15/33–it offers the longest of any Long Island general aviation field and is only eclipsed by those at JFK. Its facilities include a terminal building with two rental car counters and the Apron Café; Shelt-Air Aviation Services, the airport’s only fixed base operator, with fuel, aircraft parking, and servicing; the Suffolk County police’s Aviation Section, which bases a helicopter there; and the Hampton Business District, whose eventual 400,000-square foot Industrial Park promotes local community growth.

In the 12 months ended on December 31, 2010, it the airport had 107 based aircraft and fielded 83,712 annual movements.

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Show Off With a Great Skateboard Ramp

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Skateboarding is fun, a great form of exercise, a way to meet new people with similar interests, and a way to show off athletic prowess. One of the best ways to show off agility and athleticism is with the help of a good skateboard ramp. Skaters will be able to find many different types of ramps on which they can practice their skills. Some of the most common ramps are quarter pipe, half pipe, pyramid, hip, wedge, launch, and bank.

Each of the different types of ramps allows for different kinds of tricks. Ramps are also designed for specific skill levels. As one gains more confidence and skill, he or she can move on to the bigger and more daring skateboard ramp styles.

Many skaters practice at skate parks, but this is not always easy. Skate parks attract big crowds, making it difficult for an individual skater to utilize the ramp for any real length of time. In addition, new skaters may find the crowd intimidating. In these cases, it could be a good idea for skaters interested in increasing their skills to practice with a personal skateboard ramp. Many of the personal ramps on the market are foldable, which makes them easy to transport and take to different locations. By placing several different types of ramps together, skaters are able to create their own personal skate parks.

Freshpark is a company that creates skateboard ramps perfect for practice, training or just to have a good time. Novices and professionals alike can find a skateboard ramp that meets their needs.

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A Psychological Profile Of Janis Joplin

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“The greater the feeling of inferiority that has been experienced, the more powerful is the urge to conquest and the more violent the emotional agitation.” —Alfred Adler

Biographical Overview

Janice Joplin was born January 19, 1943 in Port Arthur Texas to Seth and Dorothy Joplin. Janice was the first born child in a family that would eventually include a sister Laura, who was born 6 years later, and a brother Michael, who was born 10 years later. Janice’s early family life was relatively normal, and as a child she was exceptionally curious and bright. Janice often made up stories as a child and began writing plays while in the first grade, and even at a very young age her creative talent seemed to be developing.

One early story recounted in Myra Friedman’s (1973) book on Janis, recounts how Seth would take the Janis and eventually her siblings down to the post office to look at the pictures of the wanted men as a form of entertainment. Given Janis’s later utter and total disregard for the law and conventionality in her life, one wonders if Janis didn’t develop some kind of sympathy for the “outlaw” from these early experiences, as she certainly began to view herself as existing outside of the bounds of normal society.

In Janis’s words, “The whole world turned on me” when she entered High School, and these years seemed to have an especially profound influence on Janis as well as her later work. Port Arthur was in many ways a rough and even violent city, and as a port town had a number of bars and houses of prostitution to service the men who came to work there. Janis witnessed extreme racism while growing up in Port Arthur, and her tolerance and acceptance of people from other races quickly earned her the nickname “nigger lover” which was one of many that she would eventually acquire in Port Arthur. During this period Janis also gained weight and developed bad skin, and she was often also called a “pig” by the other children in the school.

Following High School Janice enrolled at Lamar State College which she found was much like her High School in Port Arthur, as she again experienced a great deal of rejection here and eventually dropped out. With her parent’s blessing, Janis moved to Los Angeles to live with one of her aunts. Janis eventually moved out of her aunt’s home into a place of her own in Venice Beach and it was during this trip that she began to seriously use drugs including heroin. Having nearly died during her experiences in Venice Beach, Janice again returned to Port Arthur, and eventually decided to return to school, this time at the University of Texas in Austin.

It was during this period of her life where Janis began performing seriously as a musician. She had discovered the blues through listening to records by Odetta and Bessie Smith, and Janis showed an amazing ability to imitate these singers, which was a lifelong talent she had developed even as a young girl. Janis would often play in coffeehouses and other campus spots around Austin, and it was during these formative years where she was able to put together her blues, folk, and rock influences into her own integrated and unique sound. Janis’s favorite place to play was the legendary Threadgill’s where she became close friends with owner Ken Threadgill who was a very positive force in Janis’s life.

Although Austin included many more anti-establishment types than Port Arthur, Janis was still ridiculed and mocked at the University of Texas, and her sense of inferiority as a result of this reached its pinnacle when she was nominated for the “Ugliest Man on Campus” award while attending school in Austin. This was the final blow to Janis in Texas, and shortly after this even she packed her bags and moved to San Francisco to pursue a career as a singer.

Janis moved to Haight Ashbury in 1966 which at the time was the epicenter of the 1960’s. Bands such as the Grateful Dead and the Jefferson Airplane were also coming up at this time, and the music and freedom made the Haight in the 1960’s for many a magical time and place to be. Janis found an incredible sense of belonging with Big Brother during this time, and their early work as a band represented the raw energy and improvisational nature of rock and Roll that people were beginning to take notice of.

Janice soon began to outshine Big Brother however, and although they were a highly energetic live band, their improvisational style did not translate well in recording sessions. Janice on the other hand took a great interest in the recording sessions, and was committed to recording an album that demonstrated Big Brother’s and more importantly her own unique style. With Albert’s encouragement, Janice eventually left Big Brother, and this act was seen by many in the band, as well as many of Janice’s personal friends, as an act of selfish betrayal.

Janice next formed the Kosmic Blues Band, which she spelled with a K in honor of Franz Kafka, who was one of the many novelists that Janice loved to read. The band was supposed to mark a return to Janice’s blues roots, but her first gig in Memphis, a city rich in the blues tradition, was a disaster as the new band received a very lukewarm response from the Memphis crowd. During her time with Kosmic Blues, Janice, already a regular heavy drug user became more enamored of Heroin. Janice’s Heroin use continued to increase throughout her time with the Kosmic Blues band, and by the time it came to play at Woodstock in the summer of 1969 she was most likely addicted to the drug. In one particularly disgusting story, Janice’s friend and lover Peggy Caserta (who would later go on to write “Going down with Janis” recounts how Janis snuck into the portable toilets to shoot Heroin prior to her performance at Woodstock. In any case Janice’s performance at Woodstock was not thought to be one of her best, and it was at this juncture of her career where her Heroin abuse and continued heavy drinking seemed to adversely begin affecting her music.

Realizing that the Kosmic Blues band was not working, Janice also left this band, and in the last year of her life formed her final band that was known as Full Tilt Boogie. It was also during this period that Janice formed a friendship with Kris Kristopherson who would eventually become her lover, and who also wrote Janis’s seminal hit Me and Bobby McGee which is the song she is most known for today. During this last phase of her life, Janice began referring to herself as “Pearl” which to her represented the tough- talking highly sexed festive side of her nature.

One significant event that occurred at the end of her life was Janice’s ten year High-School reunion. Janis announced her plans to attend the reunion on the Dick Cavett show while also telling the host Dick Cavett that during her time at Port Arthur that her classmates “laughed me out of class, out of town and out of the state, man”. Janis wanted to return to Port Arthur to show those that had picked on her and ostracized her that she had made it after all, while also still craving acceptance from the town that she thought her fame would bring her. Janis was drunk most of the time during the reunion, and because she had made several negative remarks about the town in the national press, her visit did not achieve what she had hoped, and once again she left Port Arthur feeling rejected and unloved.

Upon returning to San Francisco Janice’s Heroin usage had increased significantly, and it was also during this time that she met and quickly became engaged to a man named Seth Morgan who was from a wealthy east coast family. By all accounts Seth was a dishonorable man, and his stormy relationship with Janis did not appear to be based on any kind of fidelity from either party. During Janis’s last months in San Francisco she also reconnected with Peggy Caserta whose appetite for Heroin nearly matched Janis’s. Peggy and many others of Janice’s friends continued to use Heroin with her in her last month, but Janice was using the drug alone in a seedy hotel when she eventually died from an overdose on October 4th 1970.

Janis’s death deeply saddened her friends as well as her fans, but many, including Janice herself, did not expect her to live a particularly long life. Her rampant alcohol and Heroin use had set her on a collision course with death that seemed inevitable, and with this in mind, many people considered the idea that Janice Joplin’s death was not in fact an accident but rather a suicide. While a coroner’s report showed that the Heroin Janice had used that night was especially pure, one can certainly speculate that Janis Joplin contributed greatly to her own demise. Despite the fact her death was eventually ruled an accident, it is clear that Janis Joplin’s sad and unhappy life ended as a direct result of her own actions.

Analysis

Gender Role Preparation perceived through Gender Guiding Lines and Role Models

One of the ways a child makes his or her way in the world begins with an acceptance or a rejection of their gender guiding lines. In this regard, Janis Joplin’s relationship with her mother becomes fascinating to analyze, as Janice and her mother’s interactions were often characterized by a battle of wills and a great deal of turbulence. Janis’s mother, who was a Sunday school teacher, expected Janis to conform to the rules, wear dresses like the other little girls, while also making the family proud with her accomplishments. In this regard Mrs. Joplin had high expectations for her daughter concerning both conformity and accomplishment, and this seemed to send a mixed message to Janis that affected her future ambitions and desires.

Despite Janis’s rejection of the maternal guiding line, she did identify strongly with her father who was an intellectual man who enjoyed reading and was much more accepting and permissive of Janis than her mother. Janis seems to have strongly identified with her father instead of her mother, and this speaks directly to her eventual embrace of many more traditionally masculine qualities in her life.

Janis eventually almost totally and completely rejected her mother’s wishes that she be like the other girls, and therefore rejected the female guiding line in the family which also seemed to have an effect on her sexuality. Although Janis talked a few times of achieving married life with a “white picket fence” she found belonging by wearing pants and acting like one of the boys, and for Janis this included sleeping with by her own account “a couple of hundred” women throughout her life, including one in her High School years.

Much has been made of Janis’s sexuality, and one feminist writer attributed Janis’s drug use and lifelong pain as resulting from being unable to fully come out and experience life as her lesbian self. In essence she made Janis a martyr for lesbian causes, and this idea is provocative and interesting to consider with regard to Janis. It certainly must have been difficult for Janis to reject the feminine guiding line in the family without it having some affect on her sexuality, and therefore it seems highly plausible that Janis may have been predominantly attracted to other women. On the other hand Janis did also sleep with a great many more men than women in her life, but her inability to sustain lasting relationships with these men may speak directly to Janis’s confused and even tormented sexual feelings. Although she often bragged about her conquests with men, one could see this as a dramatic overcompensation for her lesbian feelings, as well as a compensation for her rejection by the boys of Port Arthur when she was young. As a star Janice spoke often about her increased access to “pretty young boys” and one wonders if her often false bravado when speaking about men may have simply been attempts to deal with feelings of childhood rejection and inferiority.

When children reject their parental guiding lines, they may often turn to role models to guide them. In Janis’s case because such a role model was not available in Port Arthur, she found this guidance through emulating and studying the music of Bessie Smith, who had died several years before Janis was born. Bessie Smith was and is one of the most influential Blues singers in American history and Janis felt a kinship with the blues where she was drawn not just to the music but also to the sadness and pathos that produced the music. Janis remarked often throughout her career that singing the blues required suffering, and Janis used this belief to justify and rationalize her Heroin abuse.

Janice did draw strength from visualizing the blues singers that had come before her however, and the anguish and pain in her voice while she was singing appeared to be a true representation of Janis’s often tortured life. Much like the Blues singers she was emulating, Janis did use music to make sense of painful feelings, and the power and influence of Blues singers like Bessie Smith provided for Janis a roadmap of how to process these feelings. Bessie Smith was in fact such a powerful influence on her, that Janis contributed half the money for Bessie Smith’s memorial so she could be properly honored and remembered.

Interpersonal Style perceived through Experience of Family Atmosphere

One thing that Janice seems to have inherited from her mother was a sense of frugality which Dorothy had developed from her experiences seeing her family farm lost to the depression. Janice was not particularly generous with money over the course of her career, and despite her blatant disregard for the rules, friends who went through Janice’s possessions (Friedman 1973) following her death found several “meticulously organized checkbooks, all balanced to the penny.” Janice also always scoured for the cheapest item when she was grocery shopping, and would spend extra time comparing differences in price on items although money was really no object in this instance. Considering Janice’s otherwise highly disruptive life, this seems almost miraculous, and certainly speaks to the fact that Janice respected at least some of her family’s established values.

Another instance where Janice seems to have rejected her mother’s guidance was in the area of spirituality, where Dorothy who was a Sunday school teacher, tried to instill in her children ideas consistent with conventional morality. Janice wildly rejected this idea, and adopted an extremely hedonistic attitude where if something felt good to her she was quick to do it. Janice often expressed this philosophy of the immediate throughout her life, and this ran directly opposed to the family’s religious convictions that there was a life after this one where we received our final rewards.

The family’s experiences with music are also important to consider with regard to Janis’s interpersonal style. At one time Dorothy was such a talented singer that she received a full scholarship for her musical abilities to Texas Christian University. Dorothy continued to sing in the church choir when Janis was little, and the family had a piano to celebrate Dorothy’s love of music. When Janis was young Dorothy had one of her vocal cords severed in an accident during a surgery, and Dorothy could no longer sing as a result of this experience. Seth then sold the piano and this seemed to convey an unusual message to Janis about music, and may have a relationship to Janis’s fear, repeated often throughout her career, that she would loose her voice and therefore her career.

Janice’s eventual embrace of music could be interpreted a couple of different ways. First, that she carried on the family torch passed down from Dorothy, or second, that she took to music because it was something her mother could no longer do. Considering how stormy the relationship was between Janis and her mother, and the fact that Seth sold the piano because it was too painful to have around for Dorothy, it seems possible to speculate that Janis’s music was in some ways a reaction against her mother. The kind of music Janis did go on to produce was certainly far different than the music Dorothy studied in school and perhaps Janice’s embrace of music could be interpreted as both an ode to, as well as a reaction against, Dorothy’s love of music.

Perspective on the World perceived through Experience of Psychological Birth Order

Janis was the first born child in a family of three, and this also influenced her perspective on the world. First born children are often the responsible and conservative children in the family, and can become in many ways like second parents to the other children. In Janis’s first 6 years of life she behaved much like you would expect an oldest child to behave, as her mother reports she learned to sit and cut her food and eat and talk like an adult at a very early age with amused and surprised Dorothy. Janice was also very well-behaved and had excellent manners, and her mother reports that her behavior was nearly beyond correction in these early years.

Things changed when Laura was born when Janice was six, as not only was Janis now dethroned as the only child, but Laura had health complications which took up even more of her mother’s attention. Interestingly Janis did not at this time become a jealous and overbearing sibling, but instead became very attentive to Laura and cared for as a kind of surrogate parent.

A fascinating switch in the psychological birth order perspective did happen later however, when Janis began to get jealous that Laura appeared to do things that met her mother’s high expectations whereas Janis consistently let her down. Children often find belonging in families by engaging in behaviors that are different than their siblings. In the case of the Joplin’s this happened much later when Janis was in High School, where Janis was now finding belonging as the misbehaving child where Laura assumed the role of the responsible one. Normally this dynamic is exactly reversed, but in the Joplin’s case Laura now assumed the vantage point of the first born child and Janis as the reckless and wild second born.

This pattern continued throughout the rest of their lives, as during her periods of conservative behavior Janis would often ask for Laura’s assistance picking out the proper clothes and seek her advice on style and other matters. Although Laura was six years younger, she seemed to eventually surpass Janis emotionally as well, and her story is very much intertwined with Janis’s even today. Laura eventually earned a PHD in education and became a motivational speaker. She also wrote a book called Love, Janis which provided letters Janis had written home to the family throughout her career, and this book, which was later made into a Broadway production, helped a lot of people reach a greater understanding of Janis Joplin’s inner world.

Self Assessment perceived through Genetic Possibilities

It is impossible to talk about Janis Joplin without talking about her physical appearance, as this was at the root of a great deal of Janis’s inferiority and perhaps even a partial explanation for her extreme talent. Although Janis was by all accounts an average looking girl growing up, she went through a particularly awkward stage in High School where she gained weight and also developed skin problems. In Texas in the 1950’s this must have been particularly difficult, as beauty was certainly a cherished value for women in this time and place, and a person’s self-worth could easily become tied to their appearance which seems to have happened to Janice. Rather than attempt to play a game she felt she could not succeed at, Janice instead chose to respond in the exact opposite manner, and she made her personal appearance a very low priority.

This is classic safeguarding behavior where a person creates a sense of rejection themselves before others have a chance to reject them. In Janis’s case she would put on a brave front when others would call her a “pig” in High School, but then go home and cry about this rejection. It must have particularly painful for Janis to be nominated for “Ugliest Man on Campus” while at the University of Texas, as this was a place where she had finally found some belonging and had experienced some success as a singer.

Being constantly rejected for her appearance, Janis only felt beautiful in her life when she was performing. It was on the stage where her wild sexuality and charisma finally shined, and this for Janis meant the stage became the only place where she every truly felt accepted. Janice spent the rest of her life following High School chasing the “pretty boys” and this seems to be overcompensation for the rejection she felt from the popular boys both in High School as well as at the University of Texas. She made much of her one night stand with New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath, even announcing their affair over the microphone while doing a New York concert, and also bragged about sleeping with Jim Morrison, Dick Cavett, and many other men which may have been simply further attempts to prove that she was indeed wanted by the “popular” crowd.

This certainly seemed to be a large part of her motivation to return to her High School reunion where she hoped to show those that had rejected her how she had made it. When Janis was again rejected at her High School reunion it seemed to bring all of her intense feelings of inferiority back to the surface, and have at least some relationship to her final and fatal Heroin binge.

It is also interesting to consider Janis’s engagement to Seth Morgan with regard to the timing of her reunion. Seth, whose east coast pedigree led Janis to believe that he was in fact one of the “popular” boys she had always sought after had also assured Janis he did not want any of her money, and even signed an agreement that assured this. For Janis this may have been a last grasp at fitting in and dealing with the feelings of inferiority her reunion stirred up, and a final attempt at finding the belonging that she so desperately craved.

Openings for Advancement Perceived through Environmental Opportunities

It is impossible to attempt an understanding of Janis Joplin without also understanding the times she came of age in. The 1960’s was a period of great revolution and change, and provided the perfect backdrop for Janis to unharness her raw energy and power through her music. Prior to the 60’s women had no such opportunity, and the classic model of the Rosemary Clooney type lounge singer was a paradigm that Janis helped change and recreate for many future generations. The fact that Janis came along concurrently at the height of the woman’s movement was also significant, as she became for many a symbol for women’s sexual freedom and experimentation that had previously been taboo. Had Janis come along in another era, her brazen sexuality would not have been well received, and Janis was a direct benefactor of as well as a contributor to, the women’s movement.

Range of Social Interest perceived through Other Particularities

In Adlerian psychology, a person’s mental health can be measured by examining a person’s social interest in other human beings. In Janis Joplin’s case her early inferiority produced such violent insecurity that she had a very difficult time getting close to others and maintaining intimacy in her personal relationships. Although Janis was often taken advantage of by others in her life, she relished in thinking of herself as a victim as it confirmed her existing feelings about herself.

For Janis the circumstances of her life must have contributed greatly to her confusion about other people’s motives concerning their feelings for her. Before she was famous she was mocked and ridiculed by nearly everyone she came into contact with, excepting a few select friends she made along the way. She felt inferior in her home life and that she wasn’t living up to her mother’s expectations as to what a woman should be. Then when she became famous suddenly the whole world took an intense interest in her, and it is easy to see why she would doubt the motivations behind this interest given her prior experiences.

No where was this more evident than at Janis’s reunion where she wanted to show the people who had mocked her how important she had become, while also badly seeking their acceptance. For Janis the Thomas Wolfe axiom that “You can’t go home again” seemed especially appropriate, and all of these conflicting cognitions and emotions must have created a great deal of psychic turmoil in Janis which she numbed by using Heroin.

In this regard, Janis remarked to Myra Friedman (1973) that “her only true friends were the junkies she used to hang out with” and this is a telling statement that speaks directly to the fact that drug addicts often gravitate to each other in a kind of shared misery. The fact that Janis made this remark seems to confirm her low opinion of herself, and how this low opinion affected her interactions with others. Because Janis was so in need of love from others, she surrounded herself with sycophants who would often tell her whatever she wanted to hear, which was a fact Janis was well aware of.

Although many singers from this era including Janis’s one time lover Country Joe McDonald became very involved in political causes in the 60’s, Janice’s message seemed to be more about freedom through breaking off the shackles that society imposed. Perhaps because the 60’s were such a time of freedom, many serious addictions such as Janis’s were overlooked under the guise of free living. The dream of Timothy Leary and others like him that drugs could be a mind expanding tool has not been realized, and many such as Janis developed severe and pathological addictions as a result of this idea. This was the paradox of the pairing of drugs and freedom, as, although the drugs were meant to free a person’s mind, they often made them virtual slaves to their addictions as was the case in Janis Joplin’s life.

Conclusion

Janis Joplin’s life was clearly very sad, and demonstrates the pathology and sadness that exists in someone who, despite achieving considerable wealth and fame, never learns to overcome feelings of inferiority towards the self. Alfred Adler’s quote “The greater the feeling of inferiority that has been experienced, the more powerful is the urge to conquest and the more violent the emotional agitation” seems especially relevant to Janis’s life. In many ways Janis positively channeled and compensated for her feelings of inferiority through her work on the stage, but when the music was over Janis was always left with the same uncomfortable feelings. Several of the books on Janis’s life describe how despondent she would be following a performance, and this may be because the stage was the only place she truly found the love and acceptance she so desperately craved.

Many factors contributed to Janis’s inferiority, and the stars all aligned in a very unique way to create the life that was Janis Joplin’s. Her early and continued rejection by the other children, particularly in High School created a lifetime of negative feelings about her physical appearance, and these feelings were probably exacerbated through her interactions with her mother who wanted her to be more like the other children. Because Janis was not like the other girls, she assumed many masculine traits, and somewhere along the way her feelings about sexuality became very confused. Although there is significant evidence to demonstrate a genetic link to homosexuality, there are also almost certainly environmental factors which can contribute to this, and Janis Joplin’s life seemed to be an excellent example.

Despite Janis’s sexually ambivalent feelings, she many times remarked about a mythical “white picket fence” kind of life that she longed for that would bring her some consistency and stability. But Janice was also terrified of giving up her stardom, as this was also the only thing she had to cling to that gave her a sense of accomplishment in life. She had created the “Pearl” image and now she had to consistently live up to it, and this required a pace that no one could possibly maintain.

Janice was also a product of her times, as more than any other decade before or since, the 1960’s were a time of great change, paradigm shifts, and revolution, and Janis helped define these times while also being swept away by them. The music of the 60’s reflected a large break in society where kids were expected to “never trust anyone over 30” that never quite considered what happened when they reached 30. For Janis, her reckless lifestyle, intense feelings of self-loathing, and raging feelings of inferiority eventually overwhelmed her, and her death at the age of 27 was truly tragic considering the further contributions she may have gone on to make.

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How to Repair a PCL XL Error

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Occasionally HP printers can run into an issue known as a PCL XL error. Apparently, the PCL XL error makes it impossible to print certain documents. It can occur intermittently or with every request to print. Fixing it is key to getting the printer to work correctly again.

Different Types of PCL XL Errors

This type of error indicates an interruption in the print stream: for some reason, the printer sees the stream as corrupt. PCL XL refers to a “language” that the computer uses to communicate with the printer. HP forums describe it as being “highly structured,” which is the reason that any little disturbance will be picked up by the printer and keep it from doing its job.

If the user only experiences these errors in an intermittent or seemingly random fashion, it is most likely that the error lies somewhere between the computer and the printer. Anything from a bad cable, to a bad network, to a bad port could lead to a PCL XL error. Possibly the printer itself is at fault.

If the error is more regular or produced every time a document is printed, the cause is most likely a driver issue. Drivers are the programs that let the computer communicate with the printer. These may be difficult to fix.

Several Ways to Fix PCL XL Error

Various activities can create problems with drivers. Changes to networks or the drivers themselves can trigger these errors. Unfortunately, staying on top of Microsoft update may also induce a driver error if one of the updates changes the driver. Try locating the printer’s disk and reinstalling the drivers or going to the manufacturer’s website to download them.

Sometimes, computers have been set up using universal drivers to communicate with the printer, and these seem to have more problems. Locate and download the exact drivers for the printer being used.

Another option that works well for some machines is to disable some extra printing features:

1. In the program you are working with, click File, then Print, then Properties, and finally Advanced.

2. Disable the “Advanced Printing Features” option.

3. Disable the “Print Optimizations.”

This does not necessarily fix the error per se, but allows printing to continue without seeing the error message.

Driver Errors Can Be Registry Errors

Drivers talk to printers by way of the registry, since that is how the computer catalogues these various background files. If a registry entry has been corrupted that deals with the printer-computer connection, the the user may see an error. Research using a registry cleaner to fix a PCL XL error and get the printer running again.

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Myers Briggs Personality Type and Political Affiliation

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We’ve all come across people who just seem incapable of modifying their perspective based on new data being presented. Most of us still mouth the words that additional education (or indoctrination/propaganda as is often the case) is what is needed since surely this person will turn around if his/her consciousness is sufficiently expanded with additional data backing your perspective. However, all too often deep inside we know that some people are “hopeless”. This conclusion concerning failure of propaganda is reached from all over the political, cultural, and religious spectrum at one point or another. It thus becomes fashionable to outright dismiss “inconvertible” individuals and opposing zealots (on political and religious fringes of any given population) as nuts and crazies.

Personality theory in psychology allows us to better categorize individuals in society without resorting to name calling. Myers-Briggs typology in particular offers a better construct (compared to useless terms like conservative and liberal for example) to predict how an individual will act politically and socially. Myers-Briggs research combined with biology and brain scan techniques also offers us hints at understanding the underlining anatomical basis that predisposes a person to be either a disagreeable radical or a gentle follower.

There’s been little relative popular attempts to scientifically explain why the bulk of the population is always a warzone between the extreme fringes. It’s just assumed that it will always be this way just like there will always be criminals and extremely altruistic self-sacrificing givers. This assumption seems reasonable and obvious but gives rise to two other creeping and unsettling assumptions:

1) The human population is relatively fixed along a bell curve type continuum. Perhaps this is better visually represented by a sphere with a number of spikes extending from it. The moderate population is the bulk of the sphere and the zealous “radical” factions (whose opinions differ dramatically from the statistical average) are the spikes extending from the sphere’s surface (as well as into the interior to some degree which would represent silent sympathizers). It is irrelevant to label the spikes as extreme left, right, etc. All that is important is that a relatively fixed minority of the population (lets say 10-20% range) will be:

a) prone to modes of thought that are tangibly different from majority’s

b) prone to action and lifestyle based on these thoughts

Authors like Friedrich Hayek for instance, observed that in 1920s Germany roughly a million workers swung their support between communists and Nazis based on who was winning. It was noted that the two seemingly opposing ideological parties clashed with one another the most because they were very often competing for recruits in the same psychological pool of young people. Considering how many overexcited Americans called both Bush and Obama the new “Hitler” in recent years, we can easily imagine how an aggressive drooling at the mouth anti-war protestor from a big city could have been an equally excitable protester at a teabag rally if only he was born in a small town and into a different culture.

2) Since the ratio of intensely active people (prone to being perceived by population at large as “wingnuts”or criminals or radicals or genuinely informed and committed activists, etc) to more relaxed apathetic majority seems to be roughly fixed across all societies and globally as a whole, the explanatory basis for such a dynamic can only be biological. Just like there exist (and can further be bred) aggressive dogs and peaceful friendly dogs, there exist aggressive people, natural Buddhist-esque peaceful people, etc. A person who is an aggressive pit bull equivalent (and who wants to impose his views of the world onto others the most) would differ in his relatively extreme ideology depending on what part of the world he was socialized in. Psychiatry has shown us that people are born with different ratios of neurotransmitter production and quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the types of chemicals that affect their mood and cognition. We now understand that people differ a lot more in terms of brain architecture than they differ in terms of things like body type, skin color, fast twitch/slow twitch muscle ratio, etc.

The reason why these assumptions are unsettling is not because there is a degree of fatalism involved (“he will be a radical of one stripe or another no matter what” or “he will be socially lazy, shallow, apathetic, and uninvolved no matter what). Obviously with modern socialization methods and pharmaceutical modification (with psychological genetic and cybernetic modification to follow in near future), an individual can be shaped more than ever before by society and by himself. The assumptions are unsettling because if the broad direction of our views, opinions, and political/cultural/religious affiliations are largely physiologically determined at birth, then societal progress becomes enormously more difficult. Societal progress can be defined here as one zealot faction (that is seen by majority as the most “correct” in its socioeconomic policy perspectives and formulations of what humans should do next) dragging everybody else along behind it as has always occurred throughout history.

Obviously people will disagree on what constitutes progress (some actually thought arrival of Reagan was progress) but if majority of people are physiologically predisposed towards the status quo, progress of any sort becomes a lot harder in a democratic society. In the past, one intense dedicated fringe of the aristocratic elites dragged the other nobility along behind it (since majority of nobility would also have a soft apathetic bulk) and thus dragged the rest of the population behind it as well. We also had scenarios of power vacuum developing and one intense fringe political faction overpowering the others (as in the case of Bolshevik and French revolutions) and filling the leadership position to then drag the rest of the serfs behind it.

In today’s democratic structure however, protection of the status quo is a lot more preserved since the moderate bulk of the population has a political voice and thus a way to provide the ruling elites with legitimacy. The moderate bulk of the elites now also has ever more sophisticated consent and perception manufacturing methods to influence the newfound voice of the majority. For a small number of dedicated activists, pushing society along towards desired version of progress against the forces of social inertia is now harder than ever. The powerful activists now need to sway both the fellow elites and the people simultaneously.

Let’s finally get to the Myers-Briggs part of the article to see what we are now dealing with.

The most widely used way to get a glimpse of people’s underlining neural physiology has been the Myers-Briggs psychological questionnaire (one of the better versions found online for free can be found here). Over the past few decades, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator has been utilized to collect enormous amounts of statistical data on personality types found within the human population. The statistical type breakdown (I am using a combination of 3 different sources on the %. Don’t mind the catchy positive nicknames each type and group cluster has been given. What matters here is the number within a population.) so far has been as follows,

Protectors (SJ)

ESTJ – Overseer, supervisor = 11.8%

ESFJ – Supporter, provider = 11.7%

ISTJ – Examiner, inspector = 9.8%

ISFJ – Defender, protector = 9.9%

All SJs = 43.2%

Creators (SP)

ESTP – Persuader, promoter = 8.4%

ESFP – Entertainer, performer = 10.3%

ISTP – Craftsman, mechanic = 6.4%

ISFP – Artist, composer = 7.9%

All SPs = 33%

Intellectuals (NT)

ENTJ – Chief, fieldmarshal = 3.2%

ENTP – Originator, inventor = 3.7%

INTJ – Strategist, mastermind = 1.5%

INTP – Engineer, architect = 2.2%

All NTs = 10.6%

Visionaries (NF)

ENFJ – Mentor, teacher = 3.4%

ENFP – Advocate, idealist = 4.2%

INFJ – Confidant, empath = 1.2%

INFP – Dreamer, healer = 2.4%

All NFs = 11.2%

Each of the personality types (the well defined strong ones at least who haven’t self reported to be a mutt of 2 or more different personalities) can be seen as a specific brain type. As mentioned above, the physiological neural difference between 2 people of vastly dissimilar brain types is a lot more significant than how a person looks on the outside. That is because the brain type determines a mental and emotional predisposition of a person for the rest of his life. People classified as “bipolar” or “anti-social/sociopathic” for instance, have neural structures that will make them lean towards some things more than others during their entire lives.

We can see from the statistical breakdown that SJ (left-brained people with parietal lobe strength) predominate in the overall population. The second biggest group are the SP (right-brained with parietal lobe strength). Together they are almost 80% of the population. The SJs tend to be conservative, authoritarian in outlook, conventional, focused on concrete “what is”, and protective of the general society. They don’t rock the boat too much and defer to tradition. The SPs tend to be fun loving, crafty, entertaining, and have uncanny ability to focus on “what is” (with their parietal lobe) in order to fix and modify it.

If you look at the cute nicknames given to different brain types, you can see that the human herd pretty much needs all of them if it is to evolve and survive. Some types are needed more than others in the great scheme of things. The SJ and SP groups for example are conveniently numerous. SJ population provides a great amount of soldiers, policemen, social workers, self sacrificing charity givers, accountants, and status quo protectors. In other words they keep the herd safe even if it means stagnating the herd through using their positions in the executive to slow down rapid change. SP group provides us with artisans who improve quality of life for the herd through provision of entertainers, artists, dancers, singers, and resourceful improvising mechanics. SPs can be said to exist to entertain SJs and keep them on their toes by having more fun than them.

It’s easy to see how SJs lean republican and SPs lean democrat overall. The jokes that democrats have better sex lives than republicans begin to acquire an element of truth (considering the different approach left and right sides of the brain take in deciding on how to deal with the here and now). However, the two large groups are united by their concern with all things as they are in the now. That makes the two groups friendly and status quo leaning by default. An ESTJ born in Brooklyn may identify as a traditionalist democrat whereas an ESTJ born in West Virginia may identify as a traditionalist republican, but both are more likely to seek similar professions and get along if they hang out together. Brain type identification provides a lot more material to predict a person’s behavior and views on the world than simple political identification.

The overall theme emerges that people with neural computers that predispose them to either protect the status quo or be apathetic about it (since they are busy pursuing hedonistic adventures) are the supermajority that are not as interested in “what can be” (as the less numerous NP and NJ groups tend to be). A point must be made here that not one group is more important than another and that even their numerical breakdowns seem amazingly appropriate. It would be turbulent for the herd to have for example, more ENTJs/INTJs than ISTJs/ESTJs since the problem with authority that NJs have (due to their desire to be the authority themselves) would create unsustainable infighting and not allow enough people who follow orders. Each brain type has a very key social niche and function and over thousands of years there evolved an intricate genetic balance and ratio. There are of course also multitudes of physiological “mutts” who are a hybrid of all and can’t be “pigeonholed” (the most common complaint brought against psychological typology in general).

Interestingly enough, the Hindus have spent thousands of years evolving classification of human beings into 4 broad psychological varnas or classes. Each was considered as important as the other (all parts of the same body) with their own particular temperaments and duties.

Some brain types are literally made to create new theoretical constructs on how society should be organized and which steps it should take next (INTPs, ENTPs,). When balanced by the emotional consideration and input of INFPs and ENFPs (since strong T theorists are prone to being too rigidly rational and thus not take into consideration the emotional impact of their constructs) new paths for society can be developed that would be acceptable to SJs and SPs combined. However, as explained above, these people will always be outvoted and marginalized by politicians who mobilize the other more numerous groups. “Think of the children!” is a call to arms for ESFJs and ISFJs for instance whereas being tough on crime, national strength, and defeating foreign enemies is the bread and butter of ESTJs and ISTJs.

This dynamic reinforces the need for proportional representation in our system of governance. Proportional representation is practiced in most European Union countries to great effect. This way each brain type cluster can get a political party of their own. The marginalized 20% of the population can get representation and even serve as coalition kingmakers. New voices can be heard in the discourse. Today the 20% of population has to either join the big parties they don’t like and “radicalize” them (seen by the tail wagging the dog phenomenon of militants dominating today’s Republican party and driving moderates out of it) or abstain from the process thus depriving society of valuable input. In proportional representation, each batch of brain types seen as “radicals” can find a party to call home and really support. They would also have more political representation to vent out their frustration and to institutionalize their presence and views. Citizens can then pick and choose which vision of progress to support and which to leave behind.

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5 Essential Songs to Learn on the Piano

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You want to learn a new song on the Piano but your stuck. You can’t think of a song you want to learn. I’ve put together a list of 5 essential songs on the piano that all players should learn at some point. So if you’re stuck for something to learn why not consider one of these.

I’ve chosen three songs for beginners and two for more intermediate players so players of all skill levels can find something here.

Hey Jude

Most of us have heard this classic Beatles song. Opening with straight forward piano chords it’s one of the best pop songs ever written on the instrument. While the song may sound complex it’s really not that difficult for beginners who know a few songs already to pick up. Once you know the chords figuring out the pattern isn’t that tough.

Don’t Stop Believing

Some people view this song as cheesy, personally I like it. This pop stadium rock song was probably the band Journey’s biggest hit. It’s been covered by many bands, including the hit TV show Glee and also used as the outro for the final episode of the HBO TV series, The Soprano’s. The intro is great fun to play and if you can carry a tune while you’re playing piano this is a fun one to sing as well.

November Rain

Probably not an easy song for beginners to learn but Guns N Roses November Rain was and still is a huge hit for the band and main piano player Axl Rose. It’s a beautiful piano part during the verses and it continues through out the song. You can find versions of this song to play it in a stripped down piano only version online.

Let it Be

Another great Beatles tune, Let it Be is a staple for all beginners. Like Hey Jude this song may sound more difficult to play then it actually is. The chords are pretty straight forward and there aren’t too many difficult parts beyond that. You can find the basic piano chords online and then listen to the song a couple of times to pick the progression out by ear.

Bohemian Rhapsody

When you think of this song you might not think of it as a piano tune, how ever watch a live performance of this song and you’ll see Eddie Mercury, the lead singer of Queen, playing the piano through a good portion of the song. There are versions online you can find which create some simple piano parts to play during the more complex electric guitar parts of the song.

This is another great song to sing and play if you are able to do it.

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A Winning Strategy For Farkle

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If you Google the history of Farkle, you’ll find numerous theories as to the origin of the game, all significantly different. But one thing we know for sure:

Farkle is older than dirt. First there was Farkle, then dirt.

Why do you suppose it’s been around for so long? Probably because it’s fun. Farkle has just the right combination of luck and skill to have amassed a broad appeal among people around the world and to have remained popular for hundreds of years. If you have never played Farkle, you should give it a try.

Many Farkle enthusiasts insist that luck is much more prominent in determining a winner than any skill involved. This is true in a single game. But as more games are played, skill becomes more significant and luck less significant in determining the overall winner. If you sit down with 3 friends and play 12 games of Farkle, luck alone dictates that you’ll win about 3 games, and so will your friends. 3 times 4 equals 12.

However, if you use my Winning Strategy For Farkle (and assuming your friends do not), you’ll more likely win about 4 games rather than 3. No, it doesn’t mean you’ll win every game, but over time, you will emerge as the best Farkle player in your group. Your friends will start calling you “The Farkle Expert”, or “Mr. (or Mrs. or Miss) Farkle” or “The Farkle Guru”. Would that be cool or what?

My strategy assumes the following rules:

· It takes 500 points to get “on the board”.

· It takes 10000 points to win.

· A five is worth 50 points.

· A one is worth 100 points.

· Three 1’s is worth 300 points.

· Three 2’s is worth 200 points.

· Three 3’s is worth 300 points.

· Three 4’s is worth 400 points.

· Three 5’s is worth 500 points.

· Three 6’s is worth 600 points.

· Any 4-of-a-kind is worth 1000 points.

· Straight (1-2-3-4-5-6) is worth 1500 points.

· Three Pair (2-2-3-3-4-4) is worth 1500 points.

· Any 5-of-a-kind is worth 2000 points.

· Triplets (2-2-2-3-3-3) are worth 2500 points.

· Any 6-of-a-kind is worth 3000 points.

The Strategy:

1. In the beginning of a game, when you are trying to get the required points to get “on the board”, stop throwing after you have the required points on the table, unless you can throw all 6 dice again. If you can throw all the dice again, that is called “.. and rolling” and you should do that.

Example #1: You throw 5-5-5-2-3-4

The three 5’s are worth 500 points. So you have enough to get “on the board”. So do not throw the remaining 3 dice again. Just stop and take the 500 points.

Example #2: You throw 1-2-3-4-5-6

You have a straight worth 1500 points so you could stop and satisfy the “on the board” requirement. But since you can throw all 6 dice again, you should do that.

Now that you have satisfied the “on the board” requirement, we can talk about the rest of the game.

2. If, after any turn, you discover that all six dice are worth points, so that you can throw all six dice again if you choose, you should throw the dice again. This rule is especially difficult to adhere to when you have just thrown triplets or some other high-scoring combination, and you’re thinking to yourself, “If I throw all six dice and get nothing (a Farkle, a goose-egg, the big zero, the old ‘bust-a-roo’), then I’ll loose the 2500 points for my Triplet. Oh gosh, I don’t think I could go on living if that happened. It would be devastating. It would put a hole in my self-esteem the size of the Belgian Congo”

Nah. It’s not that bad. You’ll bust (or “Farkle”) less than 10% of the time which means over 90% of the time you’ll throw some more points and improve your score.

3. So the big decision, the one you’ll have to make dozens of times in each game of Farkle, is “should I stop now, or keep throwing?”

The exact answer to this question is very complicated. But we can simplify it and put it into terms everyone can deal with. You just need two pieces of information: 1) how many dice am I considering throwing and 2) how many points would I have if I didn’t throw, i.e., if I stopped now?

If you are considering throwing:

6 dice Just do it! Don’t worry about it.

5 dice Stop at 2000 points or more. Otherwise go ahead and throw.

4 dice Stop at 1000 points or more. Otherwise go ahead and throw.

3 dice Stop at 500 points or more. Otherwise go ahead and throw.

2 dice Stop at 400 points or more. Otherwise go ahead and throw.

1 dice Stop at 300 points or more. Otherwise go ahead and throw.

4. Never hold a 5 (worth 50 points) unless you have no other choice.

Example #1: You throw 5-5-2-3-3-4

You could hold on to the two fives (worth 100 points total) and throw the remaining 4 dice. But it’s better to hold just one of the fives (worth 50 points) and throw the remaining 5 dice.

Example #2: You throw 1-5-5-2-3-3

Here, you have a single one (worth 100 points) and two fives (worth 100 points combined). So you could save those three dice and throw the other three. But you would be making a mistake. The rules say that you must hold at least one die before you can continue your turn and throw again, so the correct strategy is to hold the single one and not the two fives. So you would throw five dice.

5. When an opponent gets above 8000 points, you need to start thinking about playing a little more aggressively. Especially if your total is 5000 or less. When the difference between your score and leader becomes greater than the difference between the leader and winning the game, it’s time to take the gloves off. Up those totals in rule 3 above. Don’t stop at 400 points when you have 2 dice to throw. Keep throwing!

When my opponent is within 1000 points of winning the game, and I’m way down at 5000 points or so, I don’t stop throwing until I get above 2000 points. Every so often, I get that big throw that puts me right back in the game.

Look at it this way, although it may look dangerous to continue throwing when you have 700 or 800 points, especially if you’re only throwing 2 dice, the alternative of stopping isn’t going to do you any good! Adding 700 or 800 points to a pitiful score like 5000 isn’t going to change the outcome of the game… you are still going to lose! The only thing that will save you now is some big 4-digit turns.

So stop worrying about it and throw those dice! Throw them fast and furiously. Throw ’em like there’s no tomorrow. Throw ’em like a drunken sailor.

As I mentioned at the outset, this strategy will not guarantee a victory on any particular game. But it will ensure that you win more than your share of games. Remember, your goal is to be known throughout your town as the “Farkle Queen” (or “King” as the case may be).

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Book Summary: Better – A Surgeon’s Notes on Performance – Written by Atul Gawande

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Dr. Gawande is an excellent author. Anytime I can learn from a Harvard graduate then I will spend the time on it. “Better” talks about certain simplistic conclusions from complex problems. Being a positive deviant is how Dr. Gawande characterizes being successful and making progress in medicine or any endeavor.

Why is this important to me? Inevitably you will come across complex issues in your life. Taking a diligent approach to solving these issues will usually result in simple solutions. Better talks about how to do that. What does it take to be good at something in which failure is so easy, so effortless? Dr. Gawande tells a story of one of his patients that was admitted under his care when he was in medical school. The patient was stable and needed to be put under observation. She complained of insomnia and sweats the night before. The senior resident told him to keep a close eye on her and he agreed to see her mid-day. That one simple assumption almost cost the patient her life. The senior resident checked on her first and she had a fever and needed to be put into the ICU. She lived and was sent home fine a few days later. The point of this story is that a simple assumption to check on the patient in a couple hours could have cost her – her life. One simple thing to do separates life and death.

Better is broken down in three main parts which I will touch on briefly and then we will talk about Dr. Gawande’s recommendations for becoming a positive deviant.

1. Diligence – Each year 2 million Americans acquire an infection in the hospital and 90,000 die from that infection. Infections are complex as you can get. Where did they come from? How did it happen? When did it start? What type is it? All of these questions are valid and are part of the complex puzzle. After much study, the proper solution is WASHING YOUR hands. Now there is a strict procedure that doctors should follow, key word here is “should” and most don’t.

There are little improvements that make HUGE differences that are profiled in the book. Here is a simple example. The nurses in the operating room would routinely run out of supplies and have to go get more. Thus they leave the room and come back in. Simple solution, make sure the supplies are fully stocked so you do not have to leave. This simple solution of just-in-time supply system eliminated infections by 90% in hospital surgical rooms that employed it.

2. Measure – Another part of diligence is measurement. In the Vietnam War, when a soldier was wounded, their average time from field to the U.S was 45 days. Today it is 4 days. Gunshot mortality dropped from 16% in Vietnam to less than 5% today. The reason is not technology. It is in the process. Today there is FSU’s (Forward Surgical Units). They follow the troop battalions. Now when a soldier is hurt they perform mini-incomplete surgeries to make sure they live and then the rest of the surgery is completed after. This seems counter intuitive but it works.

The key to understanding why Forward Surgical Units work is to measure things. It became known that the time from wound to care is in direct correlation to life and death. Minimize the time – Maximize Life. Knowing this allows them to minimize the time in several areas.

3. Simplistic Relentlessness – Ingenuity is bread from measurement and diligence. Once your eyes are opened then the solution appears. This is slight edge daily behavior that creates huge results. Using simplistic relentlessness on identified problems creates explosive returns. This is the 80/20 rule on steroids. Most people would not look at the little things but a simple check list can save lives.

A great quote from the book is: “What the best may have, above all, is a capacity to learn and change-and to do so faster than everyone else.” To that end I want to talk about the five recommendations to becoming a positive deviant. This is the term for using your ingenuity to solve complex problems.

1. Ask unscripted questions 2. Don’t complain 3. Count Something 4. Write something 5. Change – These 5 things are designed to leverage the “collective know how!”

I hope you have found this short summary useful. The key to any new idea is to work it into your daily routine until it becomes habit. Habits form in as little as 21 days.

One thing you can take away from this book is count something. If you don’t measure it then you can’t manage it. This is a big deal. Spend time and measure things that are important especially if you need to solve a complex problem.

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